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Everyone a Child Should Know Memory Cards

Jenny Brake

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$7.99
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This download is only for use in powerpoint etc not for printing.It's never too early to introduce the next generation to some of the heroes of faith. These 52 memory cards will help children learn about Christian men and women from all walks of life who wanted to live for their friend Jesus.The download of cards covers the following people:Brother AndrewAugustineGladys AylwardJohann Sebastian BachThomas BarnardoCorrie ten BoomWilliam and Catherine BoothAnne BradstreetJohn BunyanJohn CalvinWilliam CareyAmy CarmichaelGeorge Washington CarverJohn ChrysostomFanny CrosbyJoni Eareckson Tada Edward VIJim and Elisabeth ElliottBilly GrahamArgula von GrumbachMary JonesAdoniram JudsonJohn KnoxC. S. LewisEric LiddellKatie LutherMartin LutherDwight L. MoodyHannah MoreGeorge MuellerJohn NewtonFlorence NightingaleRosa ParksPatrickRobert RaikesRembrandtSelina, Countess of HuntingdonLord ShaftesburyMary SlessorCharles SpurgeonC. T. StuddHudson TaylorLilias TrotterWilliam TyndaleCharles WesleyJohn WesleySusanna WesleyGeorge WhitefieldWilliam WilberforceRichard WurmbrandJohn WycliffeKatharina Zell
Distinctives:
  • Illustrated children's memory cards of heroes of the faith
  • Contains 52 Christian men and women from all walks of life
  • Can be used one per week
Title:
Everyone a Child Should Know Memory Cards
Format:
Other
Publisher:
10Publishing
SKU:
9781911272724

Review (1) Write a Review

  • 5
    Done well

    Posted by Adrian Reynolds on 11th Aug 2017

    For the past couple of years we’ve been using our traditional children’s slot in church to run a series called “50 Christians” giving a very brief bio and point of application for 50 significant Christians down the ages. I found the confidence to tackle church history from the “Through the Bible with Buck Denver” which is not afraid to teach church history to kids. We backed up the series with a set of 50 baseball–type cards each carrying a picture and some biographical detail. We had them printed as a job lot of business cards and encouraged the kids (and adults!) to collect the set. It was slightly amateurish as these things always are, but a really good use of the time in a church service to teach both children and adults the value of church history without getting into dry and dusty detail. I’m glad to see the idea now done well – better in fact than we ever did it – with a superb book by Clare Heath–Whyte and a matching set of cards with fantastic illustrations from Jenny Brake. Why not think about using these to do something similar to us? Clare’s book gives you the script and the teaching points, then the church could invest in enough sets so that kids can collect one each week. They will love it and learn as they go. Even adults might learn a thing or two. We had kids in our church buy albums to keep their collections and ask for missing cards when they were away. You could follow a similar pattern. I’ve long been a little sceptical about kids’ slots in church: if kids are taught well in Sunday School I fail to see what value the talk adds other than giving a church member something else to prepare. Moreover, they often reflect the inability of a service leader to know how to lead a service so that it serves all the congregation, including kids. But that rant aside, here is a very useful way to use that five–minute slot that will do precisely what is needed – it really will make a difference and do something that is not being done elsewhere. It would be ironic indeed if the way for adults to appreciate church history was through the kids’ enthusiasm. But why not?

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